The Republic of Rumi: A Novel of Reality
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The Republic of Rumi: a Novel of Reality

Chapter 14

Hajveri


By Khurram Ali Shafique

You followed rules and exercised control, so this virtual reality has sprung up from your imagination, showing that the education of the self has three stages: obedience, self-control and Divine Vicegerency. The process itself is setting forth the inner meanings of the names of Ali (“Whosoever in the world becomes a master over one’s own clay turns back the sun from the west”). Interesting?

The young man and his enemies

It is Lahore, almost nine hundred years before Iqbal. Beauty and majesty have combined through love in the great saint Ali Hajveri. A young man has come from Merv in Persia and is complaining about being hemmed in by the enemies.

Hajveri replies, “When the stone thought itself to be glass, it became glass and got into the way of breaking. How long will you regard yourself as water and earth? Create from your clay a flaming Sinai. Whoever knows the states of the self, considers a powerful enemy to be a blessing, who awakens the person’s potential. Becoming oblivious of one’s own self is a death more deadly than the parting of the soul and the body. Abide in self, like Joseph.”

The diamond and the bird

A diamond is being attacked by a thirsty bird who mistook it for a drop of water. “I am not a dew drop,” says the diamond proudly. “I give no drink. I do not live to become a prey.”

Presently the bird finds a dewdrop elsewhere and swallows it.

The Poet turns to you and asks, “Are you a drop of water or a gem?”

DISCUSS

  • How are the two stories in this chapter related to your moral strength in the Garden?

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The eleventh century saint Ali Hajveri explains that threats can be turned into opportunities.
Persian text