The Works of Iqbal
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Iqbal Studies


Secrets and Mysteries
The Message of the East
The Call of the Marching Bell
Persian Psalms
Javid Nama
Gabriel's Wing
The Blow of Moses
What Should Now Be Done?
The Gift of Hijaz
Reconstruction
Allahabad Address

Uncollected Works


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The Works of Iqbal

Collected Works

Secrets and Mysteries


The first book of Iqbal's poetry introduces the poet as a seer who has appeared on the scene for telling "something that no on has told before." He is the voice of the poet of tomorrow, commanded by the spirit of Mawlana Rumi (1207-1273) to reveal the secrets of life that revolve around the concept of selfhood, his message is an offshoot of the Muslim nation (which is established in the poem as a primordial entity) and the readers must pay attention to his message rather than the poetic dimensions of his work. Thus establishing the scope and purpose of his message, the poet goes in to elucidate the significance of the individual in the life of a nation in the first part titled 'Secrets of the Self' and the significance of society for an individual in the second part. Islamic concept of a Muslim and the philosophy of Muslim nationhood is elaborated in detail as practical implications of these propositions but the ideas in this book might be applicable to other models according to the needs and ideals of their followers. Originally in Persian verse. Translations available. 1915-1922. Read more...

The Message of the East


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The second book informs the reader that Nature itself has started created in the deepest recesses of life a new type of human being and a new world for him – apparently the same as envisioned by the Poet in the previous book. Glimpses of this new world are offered in poems where Rumi, Goethe and other poets of East and West hold conversations in heavens – something that seemed remarkably unusual at that time but which has become an apt analogy for the kind of cultural exchanges that have been happening since then. Envisioning these changes in the near future, the poet has compiled this book as a loving response to the Divan of the German poet-philosopher Goethe composed almost a hundred years earlier. Historically, the book also marks the cut-off point where the "tutelage" of the West, accepted by the East in the nineteenth century, must come to an end. Europe, partially due to its conservatism and partially due to dilapidation of the life forces after the First World War (1914-18), is unlikely to grasp the significance of the brave new world while the East, especially the Muslim East, apparently seems to be naturally suitable for taking the lead since it has reawakened after a long slumber – just like Germany of a century before. Originally in Persian verse. Translations available. 1923. Read more...

The Call of the Marching Bell


The third book calls upon the readers to follow the Poet towards the new world foreseen in the previous work. Anthologizing a rich selection of poems from his earliest days (about fifteen years before the publication of the first book), the Poet offers a biography of his mind and traces the gradual transformation of his ideas – not as a process of discarding one idea for the sake of another but rather as a perpetual discovery of deeper layers contained in the same truth. Following the Poet through his personal journey and diverse readings of life and books, the readers arrive witness the natural culmination of the process through the appearance of the legendary guide Khizr who reveals the secrets of the new world that Nature has built for the new type of human being in the deepest recesses of life. In the last poem, 'The Dawn of Islam', this is presented as an inside-out world where moral values have become more effective than steel, the hidden forces of history stand revealed for those who dare. Tables have turned and those who were considered the least qualified have actually become the most suitable for grasping the new possibilities offered by this world. However, even in such a new and noble era, greed still lurks in the hearts of the oppressed as well as the oppressors, due to which they may fail to see the real potential of their times. Originally in Urdu verse. Translations available. 1924. Read more...

Persian Psalms


The fourth book is intended for purifying the souls of the nations so that they may also see the world as it appears to the Poet (who now assumes the status of a "qalandar"). The tools offered for this purpose are: (a) a series of 56 monologues addressed to God; (b) a series of 75 monologues addressed to humanity; (c) a summary of the Poet's worldview in the form of nine profound questions and their short answers pertaining to thought, knowledge, union, separation, self, selflessness, perfection, 'I'm the Creative Truth' and awareness; and (d) list of examples from the art and religion of slaves as compared to the art of the free people. The process involves the discovery of a unity between the individual ego (the reader), the collective ego of humanity and the Ultimate Ego (God). Freedom comes from realizing the relationship between these and slavery is a state where this relationship is abrogated due to the slave’s deference to rulers and false idols. Hence the book contains a timely warning for the emerging nations of the East that the fetters are on hearts and souls rather than on hands or feet. Originally in Persian verse. Translations available. 1927. Read more...

Javid nama


The fifth book is an epic that depicts the process of the formulation of a new world in the soul of humanity. The process has seven stages, respectively symbolized by Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and 'Beyond the Spheres'. Mawlana Rumi takes the Poet through a spiritual tour of these stations in search of immortality. The last stage is the Paradise where luminaries from other religions are also present, such as the ancient Hindu sage Bhartari Hari. The journey culminates in the Poet's private meeting with God where God defines nation as "thousands of eyes having a single vision". The destiny of humanity is revealed before the Poet on his request but he faints on beholding the vision. In the epilogue, he addresses his son Javid and the posterity from his grave – a subtle indication that he has attained the immortality he was looking for. Originally in Persian verse. Translations available. 1932. Read more...

Gabriel's Wing


The structure of the sixth book is reminiscent of almost every book that has gone before, especially Persian Psalms, since there is similarity in the purpose of both works: the earlier work was supposed to prepare the reader to behold the overwhelming vision of Javid Nama whereas the present one offers a space for recuperation afterwards. The first part of the book consists of (a) a series of 16 monologues addressed to God; and (b) a series of 61 monologues addressed to the humanity. The second part consists of poems reflecting on various aspects of Nature, history and the contemporary world from a remarkably impartial perspective as if the reader is being asked to empathize with all nations of the world at least at this stage. Originally in Urdu verse. Translations available. 1935. Read more...

The Blow of Moses


Aptly sub-titled "a declaration of war against the present age", the seventh book can be read like a do-it-yourself kit for transforming the world according to the spiritual vision witnessed in Javid Nama. The first five sections respectively alter the general perceptions about (a) Islam and the Muslim; (b) Education and Training; (c) Woman; (d) Art and Literature; and (e) Politics of East and West. The last section consists of 20 dramatic monologues of a fictitious character Mihrab Gul Afghan, apparently a thinking person from the tribal areas of Pakistan or Afghanistan who is about to become internally displaced for opposing Western imperialism. Originally in Urdu verse. Translations available. 1936. Read more...

What Should Now Be Done, O Nations of the East?


The eighth book invites all the nations of the East to become like a single organism so that they may replace the "Pharaonic Wisdom" currently prevailing in the world with "the Wisdom of Moses" and pave the way for a unity of humankind through economic, spiritual and political empowerment of everyone. In the second part of the book, the Poet travels into "the heart of Asia" – Afghanistan, according to him – and gives hints about the hidden implications of the messages of some of the sages whose tombs are visited in the journey. Originally in Persian verse. Translations available. 1937. Read more...

The Gift of Hijaz


The ninth book is the final work of Iqbal's poetry and came out a few months after his death. The journey on which he took along the readers with him thus culminates on a gift from Hijaz (the part of Arabia associated with the Holy Prophet, peace be upon him). The gift is for everyone: the first part, which is in Persian, consists of five sections respectively addressed to (a) God; (b) the Holy Prophet; (c) the Muslim Nation; (d) the Humanity; and (e) the Like-Minded. The second part, consisting of Urdu poems, includes a vision of the Devil's "Parliament" asks his counselors to concentrate their work against the Muslim nation since Islam has the potential of challenging a diabolical and unjust world order on behalf of the entire humanity. Originally in Persian and Urdu verse. Translations available. 1938. Read more...

The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam


This is the only prose work that Iqbal got registered through copyright like the nine books of his poetry. Iqbal perceives the humanity to be an organic unity that has been developing like a single individual through history. The work of Islam, having started more than a thousand years ago, has succeeded in facilitating the cognitive development of the humanity up to the stage of concrete thought where a new method of spiritual development is required. The seven lectures of this book are supposed to work as a provisional solution in the absence of such a method or perhaps even facilitate its discovery. Accepting Nature, history and intuition as faculties of knowledge, Iqbal concludes that religion its higher form empowers the individual for a direct vision of Reality and the ultimate aim of Islam is a spiritual democracy that was inconceivable in the past. In English prose. 1930-1934. Read more...

Allahabad Address


Iqbal proposed and predicted the birth of a Muslim state in North-West India as an initial practical step towards the creation of the new world order envisioned in his other works. He explained that the state was going to be a means for realizing the organic unity of humankind. In his opinion, it was threatened by two handicaps: (a) dearth of leaders with insight into the spirit as well as destiny of Islam and the trends of modern history; and (b) a speedy decrease in the collective instinct in the community. Against all odds, and under the able leadership of Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the Muslim community of the sub-continent created the state through a fair and free election. Pakistan emerged on the map of the world in 1947 – just as Iqbal had foreseen seventeen years before, having the strengths he had promised and threatened by the weaknesses against which he had forewarned. What other possibilities lie hidden in the depths of Time is yet to be seen but may be understood better by achieving "a real collective ego." In English prose, originally distributed as printed text of the presidential address delivered at the annual session of All-India Muslim League in Allahabad on December 29, 1930. Read more...

Uncollected Works

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